801.361.8589 [email protected]
Brave the Spaces – Part 1

Brave the Spaces – Part 1

I teach a class about multicultural issues at a local university. On the first day, the students did a reading entitled “From Safe to Brave Spaces” by Arao & Clemens (2013). This reading talks about the importance of bravely pushing ourselves in uncomfortable ways so that we may feel a deeper sense of compassion, connection, and empathy towards those who are different from us. As I reflected on this reading to teach in class, I began to wonder if this concept applied to different situations. Could we move our relationships more toward bravery? Could we raise brave children and make our families brave spaces? I’ve pondered this idea quite a bit over the last several weeks and I’ve discovered that bravery is not only beneficial in our relationships, it is vital if we wish to truly connect in vulnerable and meaningful ways and truly see one another. (more…)

JOMO over FOMO

JOMO over FOMO

The Fear of Missing Out

The term “FOMO” or “fear of missing out” has circulated frequently during the past several years. It even has an official definition on dictionary.com (are they putting everything in the dictionary these days?) FOMO is defined as “anxiety that an exciting or interesting event may currently be happening elsewhere, often aroused by posts seen on a social media website.” As social beings, it makes sense that we are so impacted by the fear of missing out on memories and experiences. We might even feel like life will move on without us and leave us behind. We’ve all experienced a group sharing an inside joke that we weren’t privy too. It feels lousy to be on the outside and we will go to great lengths to prevent that feeling. Some of these great lengths involve overextending ourselves and saying yes too often; leading to feeling emotionally exhausted and neglecting other important aspects of our lives. (more…)

Embracing the “And”

Embracing the “And”

As humans, we like to keep things simple. Our brains are designed to put things into nice, neat, and uncomplicated categories. This sorting and categorizing serves an important purpose: it’s a lot easier for us to interact with our world this way. Everything seems to settle into a nice category. Happiness and sadness. Good people and bad people. Healthy food and unhealthy food. True and false. Jean Piaget, a prolific child development researcher and psychologist suggests that when new information comes into our brains, we have two options: fit it nicely into an existing category or schema (assimilation) or do a complete overhaul of the categories to fit the new information (accommodation). At some point each of us realizes that our world is not so simple and our categories do not seem to fully encapsulate our experiences with life.

(more…)